The doctoral study aims at studying the reciprocal travel of ideas, technologies and knowledges for living with marine socio-environmental hazard-related disasters | Photo: Anna-Katharina Hornidge, ZMT

Objective

The doctoral study aims at studying the reciprocal travel of ideas, technologies and knowledges for living with marine socio-environmental hazard-related disasters, with a particular focus on the everyday interactions between ‘non-indigenous’ ideas and technologies such as a tsunami early warning system (TEWS).

Research Question

How is the TEWS deployed, legitimised, and embedded into the local knowledge systems in the face of the future threat of the Sunda Megathrust in the South Jawa Sea?

Conceptual Framework

  • Epistemic Mobilities (Hornidge/Flitner 2016; Hornidge et al., in progress)
  • Social arrangements of technology (Winner, 2007)

Ethnographic Methods

In-depth interviews, focus group discussions and participant observation

In the wake of the recent atypical tsunami events in 2018 that claimed thousands of lives in the Sunda Strait and Central Sulawesi (Indonesia), the study traces the construction of diverse sciences and technologies that brought into being the ‘Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System’ as a contemporary social artifact, that is at the same time socio-politically contested.

Project Partner

University of Bremen

Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI)

Universitas Indonesia